Featured Artist… Walt Gonske!

Sea of Cortez by Walt Gonske
Sea of Cortez by Walt Gonske

Walt Gonske, an artist from Taos, New Mexico, has some wonderful work and I am thrilled to have run across it! Ahhh, the beauty of the Internet! I have found so many wonderful artists and Walt is no exception! He’s got some nice shapes going on, some fabulous color, nice brush strokes and he kept it loose enough to leave it to your imagination… I like that a lot! Give his website a peek if you get a chance!

Walt’s work reminds me a little of Charles Movalli.  Charles Movalli is one amazing painter, and a fabulous person from what I hear. You can spot one of his paintings from a mile away. He has a way of simplifying that is incredible. Matter-of-fact, I just watched a YouTube video on SIMPLICITY by Charles Movalli and it was inspirational! Check it out if you get a chance!

Read a blip about Walt from his website:

“In the past, I would have an idea for a painting and hold to that idea through to the finish.  I could pretty much see the end result before I started.  There were no surprises.  But now my understanding of the process is that the idea is just the first impulse.  From that first impulse forward, improvisation takes over.  The end result is not about that first idea, but is instead a record of all those impulses along the way.  Each stroke of paint carries emotion and power.  I work in a loose, painterly style in part because I want the viewer to see the process and not hide it behind ‘finish;’ for the viewer to maybe even feel how a particular piece of paint was put down.

Painting is not about reproducing nature.  I like the notion that art should have more to do with the communication of the artist’s emotions to the viewer through the paint itself.  

My goal in the work is not to show what I know, but what I feel.  The more intensely I can express emotion though paint about the subject, the more likely the viewer will respond.  All I can do is make an honest effort and then accept without judgement.  To remain neutral about the paintings and to not judge them as good or bad is very important to moving forward.

My best work comes when I’m able to give up control, to trust my impulses.  Then the painting takes on a life of its own.  When I don’t know what is going to happen next, the process becomes full of surprise and wonder.

We go to art school to learn the rules about drawing and painting.  After many years of developing skills and acquiring knowledge, I know what I will get as a finished product if I control the process.  What I don’t know is where it would lead and what would happen if I gave up control.  This is what interests me now.

It’s a different way of thinking – or not thinking so much.  To remain empty of all preconceived ideas about how a piece will turn out.  It’s simply a mind-shift away from repeating what I already know and to allow that unknowable, creative spirit to come through.

That’s easier said than done of 40 years of learning how to do this thing called art.  But all that stops one from stepping into unknown territory is doubt and fear.  If I’m willing to give up control over my skills and ability to do things a certain way, then new forms and techniques will come to me.”

IMAGE: WaltGonske.com

F L A S H B A C K

O N E   Y E A R   A G O…       CFADA Fine Art Weekend Photo: Mark Horton

T W O   Y E A R S   A G O…   Artist to watch… Elizabeth Pollie!

Catch you back here tomorrow!

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Fabulous Frocks of Charleston – a great window shopping painting?!

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This is a cool bridal gown shop located in Charleston, SC – it’s high class isn’t it? To me, it looks like a painting… a painting perhaps by Hai-Ou Hou who has been popping out some pretty spectacular paintings in her “window shopping” series

FABULOUS FROCKS OF CHARLESTON – This shop is different than all the others… this is a bridal consignment shop! How smart is that? You wear a dress one day and then you have it cleaned and stored in a box… unless you have children who may want to wear it, why not pass it along, collect some money and put it towards something that you can use now? Fabulous Frocks doesn’t take any wedding dress… it has to be less than 5 years old, accompanied by the actual receipt and has to have cost at least $2000. – check out their website for more info.

Catch you back here tomorrow!

[featured artist]… Kristine Pallas!

"Tasting in the Vineyard" by Kristine Pallas
Kristine Pallas

Vineyards… what’s not to love? Oh how I would like to surprise Fred for our 22nd anniversary and have a wonderful dinner beneath this magnificent tree overlooking the vineyard. Wouldn’t that be something?

I always like to see what it is in a painting that draws me in. In this case it’s the overall feeling that I get from it. Peace and quiet, good wine, maybe a bit of cheese and a hunk of good bakery bread. Silence. The sunlight peeking through the tree dancing on the slats in the back of the chair… and on the ground like fireflies… I think I need to get my paint out so that I can start making some money to make this dream a reality… ha ha… This would be a nice surprise!

Kristine’s paintings all have a good vibe coming from them… here is one more example. She’s got such great style! Check out her website if you get a chance!

"Clouds at Vineburg" by Kristine Pallas
“Clouds at Vineburg” by Kristine Pallas

LOVE the clouds and the looseness of the tree… I truly enjoy plein air paintings, you really can get a feel for what the artist is seeing at that moment in time!

Read a bit about Kristine from her website:

Kristine Pallas About kp

Catch you back here tomorrow!

FLASHBACK

O N E   Y E A R   A G O:  A Few Photos… Nikon Coolpix P510

T W O   Y E A R S   A G O:  Artist to watch… Frank Bruckmann!

Now this would make one heck of a rooftop painting!

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San Francisco, CA… gotta love it!

This would make one heck of a challenging rooftop painting wouldn’t it? Whew, not sure I would want to give it a whirl, but I would enjoy seeing the progression of an artist painting a similar scene. It facinates me how there really is no right or wrong way to paint. I see people break the “rules” all the time and they’re awesome artists… what works for one doesn’t always work for another… I like knowing I have options, ha ha…

Have a good weekend! Catch you back here tomorrow!

F L A S H B A C K

O N E   Y E A R   A G O…  Featured Artist… Romel de la Torre!

T W O   Y E A R S   A G O…  What to do with your garden’s bounty? VEGGIE PASTA! Dinner this evening!

Happy 4th of July and…

JULY4 painting by KenDeWaard

H A P P Y  4th  O F  J U L Y ! ! !

Isn’t this the sweetest painting by Ken DeWaard? Perfect for the 4th of July…! If you aren’t familiar with his work. OH. MY. GOSH! Check out Ken’s website and his blog!

Enjoy your day! Catch you back here tomorrow!

Featured Artist… Susan Graeber!

SusanGraeber CocoAtTHePrudhommeCottageMaine SG

“Coco” at the Prud’homme Cottage, Maine by Susan Graeber

I love this happy little dog… Coco is one lucky pup to have this kind of room to run around… Charlie would run until he couldn’t run anymore (if being at the dog park is any indication!). What a sweet painting. You can feel the distance, the light, the happiness…

And one more just because I like it! Don’t you agree??! Fabulous painting!

SusanGraeber SealHarborIslandMaine sg

Seal Harbor Island, Maine by Susan Graeber

Read a blip about Susan from her website:

I have had the good fortune of beginning my life long interest in painting from early childhood attending the Bryn Mawr school where creativity was encouraged. I attended Hobart William Smith colleges for one year and decided to commit to going to an art college rather than a liberal arts program, and then transferred into the Boston Museum School for two years. During that time period my family moved to Brussels, Belgium for three years, and I had the benefit of travel as well as painting programs during the summers in europe and seeing the museums first hand. After this time period I transferred into the Maryland Institute and graduated in 1980. I had a few jobs related to the arts including a gallery position, settled down and married an art dealer who is a works on paper dealer, and had two children.

I always painted plein air when our children were growing up, especially enjoying Maine and the Maryland countryside. I now am a full-time painter, and maintain a warehouse studio in Baltimore, but mostly prefer to paint on location. I love to paint on Monhegan island, Mt Desert island, New Mexico and Maryland. I am influenced by the artists Arthur W. Dow, Fairfield Porter, Wayne Tiebolt, Neill Welliver, Eduard Vulliard and others. I am most attracted to places in nature where light is creating abstract shapes, and color is creating a mood. Capturing fleeting light is always a challenge, and a thrill when occasionally it works in a painting! When painting, or even seeing that spot that pulled my attention, I am drawn to unexpected movements of light and beauty.

Catch you back here tomorrow!

Featured Artist… Francis Sills!

FrancisSills Entrance2013 fs

Entrance by Francis Sills 

One of my favorite painting subjects… the interior… It’s like being invited into someone’s home… You get to “visit” places you may never really end up. Kind of like going on a home tour… LOVE those! So very interesting to see into other peoples lives. This painting by Francis Sills is a perfect example… What a cool house!

I had heard that Francis has recently started showing his work at Horton Hayes Fine Art, a fabulous gallery in Charleston, SC – if you haven’t been… G.O. It is FILLED with fabulous artists. The “Horton” of Horton Hayes Fine Art,  Mark Kelvin Horton, as well as Chris Groves, Larry Moore, Elizabeth Pollie and Nancy Hoerter, just to name a few! Check it out if you’re in town!

In addition to showing his work at Horton Hayes, Francis has got his work hanging for a show that is part of their continuing series of independent artist exhibitions at Jericho Advisors in Charleston, SC… the show will be hanging through July 4, 2013.

Now this is the type of bio I enjoy reading… a blip about Francis from Horton Hayes website:

Francis Sills was born in 1974 and raised in central New Jersey. Exposed to the wonders of the natural world at an early age through hiking and fishing, his childhood was spent drawing and constructing things out of cardboard. Both his grandfathers were good with their hands; one as a watercolorist, the other with carpentry and building. In high school, he was exposed to new techniques and became aware of the masterpieces from Art History. Art became a magical world of possibility, a place where one could create an illusion of reality.

In 1996, Sills received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (in Painting) from Syracuse University. While he was there, he had the good fortune to study under the renowned figurative artist, Jerome Witkin, who shaped his devotion to the practice and craft of painting. Trained in the work of the Old Masters, students were taught to draw from life, and in particular the model. What Witkin offered was an example of a life dedicated to the serious pursuit of painting, shaped by one’s own experiences and personal narrative.

After graduating from Syracuse, Sills moved to New York City, and settled in Brooklyn, where he continued to hone his skills with paint. “Day jobs” included: mixing colors for a wallpaper company, creating faux finishes on furniture and lighting fixtures, working with decorative plaster finishes, and painting murals.

In 2001 Sills received his Master of Fine Arts degree from Parsons School of Design. While there, he experimented with different styles including collage, drawing installations and gestural abstractions. This work generated new ways of expression and allowed for a fresher, loosened handling of paint. After Parsons, however, the pull back to perceptual painting became too strong to deny; Sills’ heart was in realism and capturing the reflection of reality within the confines of the canvas.

Gradually Sills’ work became increasingly focused on the genre of landscape, and in particular, the urban and industrial scenes that surrounded his studio in the Gowanus area of Brooklyn. Finding beauty in the decay of post-industrial Brooklyn offered endless possibilities in form, surface and light. By working from observation, his painting began to take on the specificities of time and place.

In May of 2011, after nearly 15 years in New York, Sills relocated to Charleston, South Carolina. Since then he has generated a completely new body of work while exploring the Lowcountry and the amazing beauty that Charleston and its surrounding areas have to offer. In addition to painting, Francis is an adjunct faculty member at the College of Charleston where he teaches drawing. Sills has exhibited both nationally and internationally, and his work is in many private collections. He lives with his wife, Faith, also an artist, and their three children in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Catch you back here tomorrow!